What We Believe

 

Just as the Holy Bible is at the focal point of our Meeting House, this hallowed book is central to our faith, reflecting our ongoing commitment to the word of God and to the interpretation of its meaning in our daily lives. We are drawn together by our common confirmation: “We covenant with God and one another to walk together in God’s holy ways. We unite for the worship of God and for continued striving to do God’s will and for the service of God and humanity…” We believe in the Holy Trinity: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit.

Just as the Holy Bible is at the focal point of our Meeting House, this hallowed book is central to our faith, reflecting our ongoing commitment to the word of God and to the interpretation of its meaning in our daily lives. We are drawn together by our common confirmation: “We covenant with God and one another to walk together in God’s holy ways. We unite for the worship of God and for continued striving to do God’s will and for the service of God and humanity…” We believe in the Holy Trinity: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit.

Covenant and Policy

Covenant is a holy promise of devotion that is shared and is how we relate to one another. The UCC Statement of Faith defines covenant as a gift of the Holy Spirit binding all faithful people together. We celebrate our covenant every time there is a baptism, when we gather for Holy Communion, and twice a year when we welcome new members into the life of our church. Covenant relationship is the foundation for our way of being the church. This church acknowledges Jesus Christ as its Head. It is congregational in its polity (how the church governs itself). The United Church of Christ polity can be described as a dynamic “partnership covenant.” Partners include the UCC National setting, the Connecticut Conference, and the Litchfield North Association. This covenant values the commitment each part of the United Church of Christ has made to one another to live together, to work together in behalf of the mission and ministry of Jesus Christ in the world. Each congregation has autonomy, meaning it’s free to discern its own way of being and believing. Simply stated, the power of the Congregational tradition is the congregation itself. Yet, because of covenant, we bind ourselves to one another beyond the local church — to our partners, as well.